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Only the Guardian makes connections like these, bless them:

…the last time AC/DC made No 1 in Britain, the country was on the brink of recession. Back In Black, the album that marked their commercial breakthrough and went on to become the second biggest-selling of all time, was released in 1980, just as inflation had reached 20% and unemployment inched towards 2 million.

When the economy recovered, AC/DC’s popularity receded, albeit becoming merely immense instead of phenomenal: their “flop” 1985 album, Fly On The Wall, still sold more than 1m copies, a not unimpressive figure, but a fraction of Back In Black’s 30m sales or the 5m copies that Black Ice sold in the last seven days.

But right on cue the album that returned the band to its heyday was The Razors Edge, released in 1990 – just as Britain headed towards its last recession.

… Western capitalism might collapse but at least [Angus] Young can be relied on to perform a song about either rock and roll or testicles while wearing shorts, blazer and cap. Alas, what he can’t be relied on to do is support those who delve into the sociological implications of AC/DC’s appeal. “What we do, you’re not going to look into it with depth, y’know,” he suggested recently . “Because if you look into it with depth, you’re not going to get it.”

Brilliant.

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2 thoughts on “The Sound of (no) Money

  1. “What we do, you’re not going to look into it with depth, y’know,” he suggested recently . “Because if you look into it with depth, you’re not going to get it.”

    roflmao…. hidden shallows!

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